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Campaigner says weed he left beside garda station hasn’t been taken away.

A campaigner who has planted more than 30 cannabis plants around Cork says he’s willing to go to prison for his beliefs that the drug should be legalised.

Well-known campaigner Martin Condon has been carrying out acts of “civil disobedience” in Cork in recent weeks by planting cannabis plants at locations around the city, including City Hall and near the Bridewell Garda Station.

Full story at Sunday World. 

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Federal grant restrictions revolving around cannabis-related grant funding through the Substance Abuse and Mental Services Administration (SAMHSA) was announced earlier this week.

News broke when the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs (PDDAP) made note of a change in text for organizations that are eligible to receive federal SAMHSA grants on August 2. 

“SAMHSA grant funds may not be used to purchase, prescribe, or provide marijuana or treatment using marijuana. See, e.g., 45 C.F.R. 75.300(a) (requiring HHS to ensure that Federal funding is expended in full accordance with U.S. statutory and public policy requirements); 21 U.S.C. 812(c)(10) and 841 (prohibiting the possession, manufacture, sale, purchase or distribution of marijuana),” reads the new wording

The former text was much longer and spoke about the prohibition of funds that were used “…to purchase, prescribe, or provide marijuana or treatment using marijuana.” The original clause regarding medical cannabis limitations was added in 2020 and automatically carried on to the 2021 version.

Officials from the PDDAP released a memo on June 2, 2021, warning that SAMHSA’s policy could put health funding at risk. The memo also included a SAMHSA FAQ page with five questions and answers, dated January 1, 2020, that clarified its stance on medical cannabis.

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Jake Johnson missed acting. During the pandemic, the actor wasn’t sure if he’d work again. Instead of waiting, Johnson co-wrote a script with a collaborator from New Girl, director Trent O’Donnell, and went out into the wilderness to shoot a movie about a mother and a son. The end result is Ride the Eagle, which is an authentic, feel-good movie with plenty of cannabis. 

Cannabis plays a pivotal role in Ride the Eagle, creating a bond between the mother-son duo, Honey (Susan Sarandon) and Leif (Johnson). They’re two hippies at heart that, sadly, only reunite after Honey’s passing. She left him a to-do list and personal videos telling him what she had always wanted to tell him. 

Recently, Johnson also wrapped shooting a show called Lost Ollie with the co-director behind Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, Peter Ramsay, which kicked off our discussion about working with kind people such as Ramsay, not assholes. 

Photo Credit: DECALJake Johnson on Life and Work

Is that a big part of your decision-making, working with people you’ll enjoy being around?

It’s a huge part of it. I have no interest in working with assholes. I really care about the art of it, and I want the audience to really

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It is difficult to talk about Washington cannabis grows without considering real estate issues for the many companies and individuals that lend or want to lend funds to cannabis businesses. As indoor cannabis growing facilities sprout throughout Washington state, a growing issue for both private and institutional lenders is which method of foreclosure to pursue when the borrower defaults on the loan—judicial or non-judicial?   

Generally, when a lender lends money, the borrower must provide the corresponding real estate as collateral to the lender so that in the event of the borrower’s default, the lender can foreclose on the real estate. A deed of trust with the power of sale is usually prepared to secure a lien; and, at the time of default, the lender can choose to foreclose judicially or non-judicially.      

In Washington state, the predominant form of foreclosure is nonjudicial foreclosure. The corresponding statute can be found under the Washington Deed of Trust Act, chapter 61.24 RCW.  Nonjudicial foreclosure is considered more lender-friendly because it is a more efficient and speedier method to foreclose on real estate.   

However, lenders be beware! If the real property is used primarily for “agricultural” purposes

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Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my distinct pleasure to let you all know about some new heat that has just become available to the cannabis-consuming citizens of California. Having just dropped from the gods over at Jungle Boys, and for the first time ever available across the High Times Market & Delivery ecosystem, here’s all the info on the first hype drop from High Times.

Let’s Take A Step Back & Note the History

When I first arrived in California, back in 2014, the cannabis landscape was far different than it is today. Back then, in the caregiver days before Prop. 64 passed, there were only a handful of true brands in the market. Sure, there were a lot of cultivators growing some great weed, and many even selling it successfully, but this was still before everyone in the industry was focused on standing out with a logo or an attractive Mylar. In those days there were only a few real-deal players, and much of the industry hadn’t even begun to think about how they wanted to actually present themselves to the world⁠—they just knew that they had weed and consumers wanted it.

Although the space was still maturing, by this point there

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CANNABIS CULTURE –  Gina Hogan and Alisha Northern, two nurses with decades of medical experience, launched TX Canna RN (TXCRN) together.

“We’re holistic. We’re treating the whole person. Your psycho-social, your emotional, and what’s happening physically all kind of work together,” Gina says.

Their company – started as a booth at a local farmer’s market – is a grassroots medical cannabis business that helps Dallas Fort-Worth (DFW) clients navigate the changing policies and latest innovations in plant medicine. And they deliver. 

Now –  TXCRN promotes full plant use, especially in combination with other herbs. Their cooperating distributors provide pre-rolled combustibles and oils that contain other herbs like lavender, and sage. These herbs support the entourage effect that full flower provides. Gina acknowledges plant medicine is manifold, cannabis or not. “There’s so much we can do with just herbs and spices in our cabinet.”

Combustibles affect patients instantly.

Bioavailable CBD oil takes longer to kick in. Education on the scientific differences is core to TXCRN mission statement.

One obstacle that complicates their work is a lack of understanding among the medical community. 

“There’s so much education we need to do… because that endocannabinoid system (ECS) is really helping to guide

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Should kratom be banned on a global scale? Published in the Federal Register on July 23, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is now seeking public comment to inform the U.S. position on how the plant should be scheduled under international statute.

Public comment will help inform the FDA’s position on kratom regulation ahead of an October meeting of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD), where international officials will discuss whether to recommend the substance be globally scheduled.

Kratom and its two active compounds—mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine—are in pre-review status, according to WHO. The pre-review process determines if there is sufficient evidence to bring the substance before the ECDD for a formal review; “findings at this stage should not determine whether the control status of a substance should be changed,” according to the WHO notification.

“Kratom Madness” is sweeping the world as the plant’s properties become widely known. But supporters believe that the plant is a beneficial natural alternative to opioids, with compounds that bind to opioid receptors, but with fewer risks than powerful opioids. The number of synthetic opioid deaths moved far beyond the total number of drug overdose death tolls from heroin, methamphetamine and other street

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Sativex, the cannabis oral spray, has been chosen to be used in an upcoming study in treating an aggressive type of cancer known as glioblastoma.

The Brain Tumour Charity, an organization that seeks to increase research to find cures for brain tumors, is asking to raise £450,000 to fund the Sativex trial, which will be led by Professor Susan Short of Leeds University. 

“We think that Sativex may kill glioblastoma tumour cells, and that it may be particularly effective when given with temozolomide chemotherapy,” she said. “…so it may enhance the effects of chemotherapy treatment in stopping these tumours growing, allowing patients to live longer. That is what we want to test in the study.” 

The study will include the recruitment of 232 patients in early 2022 chosen from approximately 15 different hospitals and cancer centers in the United Kingdom. To study Sativex’s effectiveness, researchers will administer two-thirds of the patients with Sativex, and the remaining one-third with a placebo.

Approved by the United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) in 2009, Sativex contains both THC and CBD, and, using the entourage effect, has proven to be a potent medicine. It is already used for patients with multiple sclerosis. The medicine is known for its ability

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Barcelona is still fighting to try and keep their legacy cannabis clubs open, despite a recent blow from the Supreme court. 

The battle over recreational cannabis is entering a new phase in Spain right now. Last week, the Supreme Court closed the loophole in federal law created by municipal officials in Barcelona, which allows the cannabis clubs a legal space in which to operate.

Namely, the judges ruled that city officials, who have supported the clubs so far, are not competent to legislate on such matters. Since most cannabis clubs in Spain are in Barcelona, this decision is a gauntlet thrown, and from a high level, on the entire discussion.

If this happened in the United States, it would essentially be like the city of Denver facing down the federal government on, say, selling cannabis without the protection of a state vote to change the constitution and a Cole memo, albeit with a few less SWAT teams. 

The fact is that Catalonia, the Spanish state in which Barcelona is located, has a longstanding separatist tendency, which is why the city has long given a pass to the existence of the clubs.

But it is not just city officials who have come out in support of

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Sharon Bentley is, in the lingo of her country, a “sheila” who is also on a green mission she is passionately pursuing with a dedication that has seen her not only create a company but has begun to shape the Australian domestic market. Medical Cannabis Australia, the company she founded, just obtained its cultivation and manufacture licenses from the Office of Drug Control (ODC) in April of this year.

The daughter of two immigrants to Australia (her mother is from Liverpool, and her father is from a small village north of Lebanon), Bentley grew as one of six children up in a small country village in New South Wales with a population of less than 100 people. She traveled 170 kilometers a day by bus to school and back.

After graduating from high school, she moved to Sydney and started a career in the legal industry as a paralegal. After a few years of working in the legal industry, with the original goal of becoming a lawyer, she left the industry because, in her words, “it wasn’t exciting and thrilling enough.” She moved into the television business with a major Australian network where she quickly was promoted into the position of National

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