Tenessee Medical Marijuana News Cannabidiol Dispensaries

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Carnevale appeals marijuana dispensary permit denial
The Desert Sun
Carnevale has said he will not involve himself in the decision process and that Mayor Pro Tem Greg Pettis also may need to recuse himself because Pettis is helping Carnevale purchase real estate for the planned dispensary. That would leave three

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Story Created: Dec 22, 2014 at 12:34 PM CST

Story Updated: Dec 22, 2014 at 12:34 PM CST

MARTIN, Tenn. — Drugs, guns and cash all were recovered in an investigation stemming from a Saturday night traffic stop in Greenfield, police say.

When Atari Thomas, 34, of Martin, was pulled over by police in Greenfield, a search of his Lincoln Continental allegedly turned up about 25 pounds of marijuana, according to a release from the Martin police department.

The traffic stop also led police to multiple locations in Martin where search warrants were served, leading police to weapons and about $20,000 in cash, the release states.

Thomas is charged with felony possession of marijuana with intent to resale, according to the release. He is being held at the Weakley County Detention Center awaiting arraignment.

The 27th Judicial District Drug Task Force, the Greenfield Police Department, the Martin Police Department and the Weakley County Sheriff’s Department all were involved in the arrest and investigation, according to the release.

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seattle washington marijuana cannabis cup high timesThe State of Washington is in desperate need of solid, clear medical marijuana dispensary rules and regulations. Without clearer rules and regulations, medical marijuana dispensaries are left in a grey area at best, which leaves all of them vulnerable to being shut down at any minute. That of course is no way to live if you operate a medical marijuana dispensary in Washington, and is obviously bad for patients as well.

The City of Seattle was mulling the idea to issue business licenses to dispensaries within city limits. However, that plan appears to be on the verge of being scrapped. Per Seattle Weekly:

The mayor’s office is changing its plans for regulating medical marijuana businesses within city limits, and may not issue licenses after all, City Hall staffers tell Seattle Weekly today.

The revisions follow questions about the city’s legal authority to set up its own system independent of the state, as well as criticism from an array of players in the recreational pot world who argue that proposed city regulations would give medical marijuana businesses an unfair advantage.

The mayor’s plan, outlined late last month, called for two types of licenses, depending on the size of operation, and set rules for testing, the number of plants allowed and the distance businesses had to be from each other and from facilities catering to children. The plan contained some key differences from the regulations set by the state Liquor Control Board for recreational marijuana businesses. Among them was a 500-foot rule separating medical pot businesses from locales frequented by children, rather than the 1,000-foot rule used by the state in deference to federal law.

Washington reminds me a lot of how it was in Oregon before Oregon’s Legislature legalized medical marijuana dispensaries (officially legalized, no ‘grey area’). Dispensaries are all over the place in Washington. By not licensing and regulating them, it doesn’t mean that they don’t exist, and the State of Washington is losing out on revenue everyday in the process. It’s time that Washington put in place clear rules and regulations for dispensaries so that the industry can operate above reproach, and help the State with much needed tax and fee revenues, like Oregon is doing now.

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NASHVILLE – Two Colorado residents believed to be traveling the country selling large amounts of high-grade marijuana were arrested in Nashville, Tennessee, police said.

Nashville Police said Christopher Steven Crumbliss, 39, and Tasha Desmond, 21, of Breckenridge, flew into Tennessee Nov. 19 and rented a motel room.

A third person, Gary Chase, 60, from New Mexico, arrived in a 2012 Dodge Ram truck with a topper over the bed, police said.

Investigators said Crumbliss and Chase met in the parking lot, got a marijuana sample from the truck bed and gave it to a “marijuana buyer” who was an undercover officer.

As the group left the motel room, other officers moved in and arrested Crumbliss, Desmond and Chase.

Police said they searched the pickup truck and found 425 pounds of high-grade marijuana valued at $1.7 million, $354,944 in cash, 17 “burner” cell phones with the names of various states written on them, packaging material to band and wrap large amounts of money, and four pounds of hashish. 

The truck had 234,000 miles on the odometer.

“The truck mileage and the phones clearly indicated that Chase was essentially on a marijuana tour of the country,” police said.

Crumbliss, Desmond and Chase were charged with engaging in a marijuana distribution conspiracy and possession of more than 400 pounds of marijuana for resale, police said.

Bond for the Colorado residents was set at $300,000.

Chase is also charged with possessing a quarter ounce of cocaine and 2 grams of crystal meth.  Chase is being held on $385,000 bond.

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LANSING, MI — Legislation that would have allowed for the legal return and regulation of medical marijuana dispensaries in Michigan stalled out this week in the waning hours of the lame-duck session.

House Bill 4271, approved a year ago by the lower chamber, died a quiet death in the Senate, which wrapped up the 2013-14 session on early Friday morning without acting on the measure.

Companion legislation that would have allowed medical marijuana patients to use non-smokable forms of the drug — including “medibles” — also failed to advance.

State Rep. Mike Callton, R-Nashville, said he personally asked Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville to pull his dispensary legislation from the agenda Thursday afternoon when its fate became clear.

“It wasn’t going to have the votes,” Callton said. “It was really looking good this morning. I was all excited. And then the Sheriff’s Association had all their sheriffs call all their senators, and suddenly we lost a lot of votes.”

Medical marijuana advocates gathered in the state Capitol earlier Thursday, hoping to see action on bills they have argued would improve access for patients certified to use the drug for medical purposes under a 2008 voter-approved law.

Richardville and other lawmakers had been working with the Michigan State Police and governor’s office in hopes of fine-tuning the bills and addressing lingering concerns, but critics mounted a late push to bury the bills.

The Michigan Sheriff’s Association, Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police, Michigan Association for Local Public Health and the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan circulated a letter Thursday telling lawmakers that the bills would “take Michigan down an uncharted course.”

“Michigan has experienced significant and wide ranging problems for patients, local government, law enforcement and the courts in the original Medical Marijuana Act,” said the letter. “A repeat of that is likely with HB 4271 and HB 5104.”

If lawmakers are interested in new medical marijuana distribution options, the letter continued, they should take more time to work on the plan next year.

That’s the plan, according to Callton.

“We’re going to have to work with them next session to get them on board or we’re never going to pass it,” he said.

Medical marijuana dispensaries operated freely in many Michigan communities until a February 2013 ruling by the state Supreme Court empowered county prosecutors to shut them down as a “public nuisance.”

The Michigan Court of Appeals, in July of that year, ruled that “pot brownies” were not a usable form of marijuana under the medical law, clouding the legal status of various “medibles,” which some patients prefer as a healthier alternative to smoking.

Two other bills approved this week by the state Legislature and headed to the governor’s desk would legalize industrial hemp research in Michigan.

The federal government has treated hemp as an illegal narcotic since 1970 due to its similarity to marijuana, but the federal Farm Bill enacted earlier this year included an amendment paving the way for industrial hemp research in states that allow it.

The federal “cromnibus” spending bill approved this month also includes language directing the Justice Department not to interfere with the production of industrial hemp, according to The Washington Post.

Jonathan Oosting is a Capitol reporter for MLive Media Group. Email him, find him on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.

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Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) Dispels Rumors Of Pure CBD Scarcity

Nashville, TN – You don’t win in the cannabis industry by simply putting forward what you believe to be a great product. You also don’t win by simply updating shareholders about your product pipeline. According to Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA), the war in the cannabis industry also means dispelling myths and putting customers straight.

Putting records straight

In recent shareholder update, Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) chose to do just that. The company highlighted how it continues to fight myths that there are no pure cannabidiol (CBD) products or oil for that matter. It is a part of the company to keep customers informed because if customers believe a lie it becomes difficult to correct things.

There is a big fight in the legalization of marijuana. It has not been easy to change state laws, and the fight goes in more states in the U.S. where residents are pressing for freedom in handling of cannabis. With challenges everywhere, Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) is not only a provider of cannabis products, but also a guardian of the budding industry.

One of the scares around is that CBD-only oils are not there. That means that customers have to question everything presented to them as pure CBD. However, Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) maintains that pure CBD oil not only exists, but it also has an abundant supply of the same. It assured the public that hemp CBD oil can be obtained in 50 states in the U.S. and in over 40 countries in the world.

The company also continues to educate the public on cannabis issues to defend its business turf.

Media popularity

Something that has been very pleasing to the management of Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) is the extensive media coverage that the company is getting. Publicity is very important for players in the nascent marijuana industry. Medical Marijuana Inc’s executives have made media appearances in prominent outlets, and such have been good enough for the company’s business.

Huge market opportunity

According to a report in the Washington Post, the legalized marijuana industry could be worth about $35 billion by 2020 if cannabis is approved at the federal level. That makes it an industry more expensive than the NFL, worth $10 billion and the confectionery industry, which is worth $34 billion. Medical Marijuana Inc (OTCMKTS:MJNA) wants to have its shares in that $35 billion industry, and it is doing all that is possible. It remains to be seen if it succeeds.

Financial outlook

The company had $3.43 million in revenue in the most recent quarter. The figure declined from $4.82 million in the prior quarter. It had $1.57 million in cash in the latest quarter, indicating a drop from $2.96 million in the previous quarter.

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 Armed guards, armored plating and facial recognition for patients would be installed at a strip mall. Armed guards, armored plating and facial recognition for patients would be installed at a strip mall. View Full Caption

Good Earth Solutions

WEST RIDGE — The security plan for a proposed medical marijuana dispensary includes armed guards, inch-thick armored plating, a plethora of cameras and facial recognition for patients.

And the proposed heightened security at the strip-mall storefront has some residents on edge.

“The location of this is not great,” resident Estlin Feigley said. “It’s going to be a vault.”

The applicant for the dispensary, Good Earth Solutions LLC, presented its plans to a small group of residents Thursday.

Charlie Toussas, a former Chicago police officer and the venture’s head of security, said he installed an 18-inch ballast to the front of the storefront, at 1954-68 W. Peterson Ave., to ensure a would-be thief couldn’t drive into the front of the dispensary and steal the goods inside.

Steel armored plating would also be installed around the perimeter of the dispensary.

“The whole place will be encased in metal,” he said. You can’t drive through my facility, no way.”

To get inside, each patient coming to pick up a prescription would need to scan an ID card, scan a corresponding thumbprint and look into a camera where facial recognition technology would ensure the patient’s identity.

“No prescription, no card, no entry,” he said. “This is not a recreational facility.”

Meanwhile, two armed guards would be on duty at all times during business hours. During the day and at night, cameras inside and out would spot any suspicious behavior, Toussas said.

The cameras’ monitors would also be hooked up to an emergency generator in case the building lost power.

The dispensary’s inventory would be stored in a vault.

But some residents who live in the neighborhood felt uneasy that any business would need so much protection.

“At the end of the day, I don’t understand why this neighborhood would be open to the notion that … this is going to help build the community in the way we want to build the community,” said Laolu Fayanju, a resident and medical doctor.

 Armed guards, armored plating and facial recognition for patients would be installed at a strip mall. Armed guards, armored plating and facial recognition for patients would be installed at a strip mall. View Full Caption

Good Earth Solutions

But Patrick Lamb, an attorney representing Good Earth Solutions, said the security plan was required by state and city legislation, the strictest in the country.

“I think it’s overly cautious,” he said. “They’re trying to reassure the public that this isn’t going to be a problem within a community.”

Jody Bhambra, Good Earth’s CEO, stressed the benefits the dispensary would have on people in need of marijuana to treat chronic illnesses, like cancer and multiple sclerosis.

She also said the dispensary would donate $1 of every sale to Misercordia and $1 of every sale to the American Cancer Society.

But resident Sherila Mayol said. “We’re not going to benefit from this, are we?”

“Not unless you have cancer,” responded Lamb, the attorney.

At least one resident in attendance had no issue with the plans.

“I don’t care,” said 60-year resident Pat Daly. “I think [the opposition] is an over-reaction from the Not-in-my-Back-Yard people.”

On Sept. 1, the state began to accept applications for patients seeking medical marijuana, and for those aiming to operate cultivation centers and dispensaries as part of a Medical Cannabis Pilot Program.

As part of a four-year pilot program that will end in 2018, the state will only grant 60 dispensary licenses, 13 of which can be in the city of Chicago.

Once a patient receives a medical marijuana card, he or she will have to select one dispensary where they will go for marijuana.

Ald. Patrick O’Connor (40th) said the initial community meeting Thursday was part of a “very long” process that would include more community outreach.

The proposal next goes to the city’s Zoning Board of Appeals for approval.

Contributing: Alisa Hauser

For more neighborhood news, listen to DNAinfo Radio here:

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With a few members needing to leave early, the San Diego Planning Commission Thursday postponed a hearing on an appeal of an order granting permission to a San Diego State University professor to open a medical marijuana dispensary in a strip mall near Brown Field in Otay Mesa.

In October, a city hearing officer granted a conditional use permit to David Blair to open A Green Alternative in a 1,400-square-foot space at 2335 Roll Drive.

The ruling was appealed by Barbara Gordon, a North County drug prevention specialist. Blair applied for the permit under rules established by the City Council earlier this year.

The regulations require prospective dispensary owners to go through a lengthy permit application process, and also specify zoning and distances to keep the operations away from residences, schools, churches and the like.

In the case of A Green Alternative, the neighborhood is zoned “heavy commercial,” and includes a fast-food restaurant, a filling station and a warehouse.

Gordon contends that “heavy commercial” doesn’t adequately describe the area because the businesses are patronized by families with children, according to documents on the Planning Commission’s website.

She argues a medical marijuana dispensary nearby would be detrimental to the youngsters’ health and safety, and also contends the city didn’t provide proper notice of October’s hearing to shop owners in the strip mall. City staff rejected her points and recommends denying her appeal.

According to a staff report, the dispensary satisfies the city regulations.

A representative of Blair requested the postponement when it became clear that the schedules of some commissioners would not allow them to stay long enough to listen to numerous members of the public who had signed up to speak on both sides of the issue.

Gordon pointed out that a lot of people took time out of their day to attend the meeting, but she did not oppose moving the hearing to Jan. 29.

“I think to properly hear the item — which it deserves — as a full commission that the idea of a continuance properly serves everybody in the community in general of San Diego better,” said Chairman Tim Golba, who pointed out that the panel was made up of volunteers.

If A Green Alternative is allowed to open, it would be the first legal medical marijuana dispensary in San Diego and the second in the county. One opened on unincorporated land near El Cajon in July.

The Planning Commission has the final say on the issue, which cannot be appealed to the City Council.

The rules set by the City Council will allow 32 legal marijuana dispensaries within city limits — up to four per council district.

The distance requirements won’t allow collectives to operate in District 3, which covers downtown, Hillcrest and North Park.

A couple of other dispensaries have been approved by the hearing officer, though the time to file appeals remains open. City planning staff is still processing other permit applications.

San Diego law enforcement leaders said two weeks ago that they’re stepping up efforts to close illegal dispensaries following a rash of citizen complaints and the discovery of weapons at a shop in the Mount Hope neighborhood.

The City Attorney’s Office announced Thursday that a landlord was fined $250,000 for repeatedly leasing to illegal dispensaries in the Midway District, North Park and Pacific Beach. John Nobel would face an additional $300,000 penalty if caught doing so again, according to City Attorney Jan Goldsmith.

“This case underscores that landlords will be held accountable for renting to illegal marijuana dispensaries,” Goldsmith said. “There is a process in place for legally zoned dispensaries and that process should be followed”

Goldsmith said Nobel and other defendants were named in a dozen cases against property owners and dispensary operators.

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SAN DIEGO – With a few members needing to leave early, the San Diego Planning Commission Thursday postponed a hearing on an appeal of an order granting permission to a San Diego State University professor to open a medical marijuana dispensary in a strip mall near Brown Field in Otay Mesa.

In October, a city hearing officer granted a conditional use permit to David Blair to open A Green Alternative in a 1,400-square-foot space at 2335 Roll Drive. The ruling was appealed by Barbara Gordon, a North County drug prevention specialist.

Blair applied for the permit under rules established by the City Council earlier this year. The regulations require prospective dispensary owners to go through a lengthy permit application process, and also specify zoning and distances to keep the operations away from residences, schools, churches and the like.

In the case of A Green Alternative, the neighborhood is zoned “heavy commercial,” and includes a fast-food restaurant, a filling station and a warehouse.

Gordon contends that “heavy commercial” doesn’t adequately describe the area because the businesses are patronized by families with children, according to documents on the Planning Commission’s website.

She argues a medical marijuana dispensary nearby would be detrimental to the youngsters’ health and safety, and also contends the city didn’t provide proper notice of October’s hearing to shop owners in the strip mall.

City staff rejected her points and recommends denying her appeal. According to a staff report, the dispensary satisfies the city regulations.

A representative of Blair requested the postponement when it became clear that the schedules of some commissioners would not allow them to stay long enough to listen to numerous members of the public who had signed up to speak on both sides of the issue.

Gordon pointed out that a lot of people took time out of their day to attend the meeting, but she did not oppose moving the hearing to Jan. 29.

“I think to properly hear the item — which it deserves — as a full commission that the idea of a continuance properly serves everybody in the community in general of San Diego better,” said Chairman Tim Golba, who pointed out that the panel was made up of volunteers.

If A Green Alternative is allowed to open, it would be the first legal medical marijuana dispensary in San Diego and the second in the county. One opened on unincorporated land near El Cajon in July.

The Planning Commission has the final say on the issue, which cannot be appealed to the City Council.

The rules set by the City Council will allow 32 legal marijuana dispensaries within city limits — up to four per council district. The distance requirements won’t allow collectives to operate in District 3, which covers downtown, Hillcrest and North Park.

A couple of other dispensaries have been approved by the hearing officer, though the time to file appeals remains open. City planning staff is still processing other permit applications.

San Diego law enforcement leaders said two weeks ago that they’re stepping up efforts to close illegal dispensaries following a rash of citizen complaints and the discovery of weapons at a shop in the Mount Hope neighborhood.

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The San Diego City Attorney’s Office has been awarded a $250,000 judgement against a landlord that allowed marijuana dispensaries to operate out of his buildings, despite the city’s orders not to.

John I. Nobel was ordered to pay the fines – the largest penalty the city attorney’s office has ever obtained – to cover $80,000 of a previous judgement, investigative costs reaching $8,000 and the new judgement for not complying with the first decision, the city attorney’s office said.

“In cases where dispensaries operate outside of the law, we will continue to hold the operators and property owners accountable for the illegal activities,” City Attorney Jan Goldsmith said. “…And we will seek the highest penalties the courts will allow.”

Nobel’s initial assessment reached a total of $550,000, but $300,000 was suspended, so long as he complies with the requirements this time.

Nobel is required to close any remaining dispensaries operating out of his properties unlawfully and remove their fixtures and signage. Failure to do so could also get Nobel a contempt of court charge.

“This case underscores that landlords will be held accountable for renting to illegal marijuana dispensaries,” Goldsmith said.

The city attorney’s office has spent the past four years exposing and shutting down illegally operated marijuana dispensaries. During that time, Nobel had dispensaries running unlawfully out of his properties in North Park, Pacific Beach and Point Loma, they said.

Four dispensaries on Rosecrans Street were operating 600 feet from a school, which is an immediate violation of the zoning laws for marijuana cooperatives.

“There is a process in place for legally zoned dispensaries and that process should be followed,” Goldsmith said.

Five more defendants were included in the 12 cases. While Nobel was named in every case, the complaints also named Mahin Nobel. Some said Parviz Hakakha, Judith Hakakha, David Abeles and Melody Abeles were all co-owners, according to the report from the city attorney’s office.

The cases resolved in the $250,000 settlement are listed here with principal defendents in parentheses:

  • San Diego Organic Wellness, 1150 Garnet Avenue (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)
  • Golden West Collective, 2603 University Avenue (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)
  • Fresh Alternative Consulting, Inc., 3045 Rosecrans #208 (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel, Parviz Hakakha, Judith Hakakha)
  • Green Wellness Association, Inc., 3045 Rosecrans #207 (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel, Parviz Hakakha, Judith Hakakha)
  • SB Health, Inc., 3045 Rosecrans #310 (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel, Parviz Hakakha, Judith Hakakha)
  • S.C.C.G., Inc., 3045 Rosecrans #214 (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel, Parviz Hakakha, Judith Hakakha)
  • PB 45 CAP, Inc., 4688 Cass Street (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)
  • Organic Roots Delivery, Inc., 2603 University Avenue (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)
  • Lemoin Corp, 936 Garnet Street (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel, David Abeles, Melody Abeles)
  • Patient Med Aid, 2015 Garnet Avenue (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)
  • Dank on Turquoise, Inc., 841 Turquoise Street, (John Nobel, Mahin Nobel)

Complaints regarding marijuana dispensaries can be referred to the Code Enforcement Division of the city by calling (619) 236-5500.

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